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Packing for the Everest Base Camp trek can be a challenge – over the 13 day trek I encountered a vast range of climates from sub-tropical to snow and frost! Follow this hiking gear list for the Everest Base Camp Trek to help make the process a bit easier!

 


What to Pack for an Everest Base Camp Trek

written by: Erin Fry


 

 

To further complicate things, flights to Lukla only give you a luggage allowance of 10kg, with an additional 5kg allowed in your carry-on. Luckily, if you happen to be a little over your weight limit, excess baggage is quite inexpensive.

The best way to ensure that you’re prepared for all weather conditions is to pack clothing that can easily be layered. As I wanted to be relatively coordinated, I purchased clothes in a neutral palette – who says you can’t be a bit stylish on a trek! Hopefully this hiking gear list for the Everest Base Camp Trek will offer you some feminine options.

Laundry facilities are few and far between (we managed to do some hand washing in a bucket on one of our acclimatisation days) so merino clothing is always a good choice as it’s odour-resistant.

 

4 Pairs of Shoes

 

1 pair of hiking boots

Finding the best hiking boots for women are the most important part of your luggage – you have to look after your feet on a long trek! Make sure to get them well before your trek and wear them in lightly to be sure that they don’t rub.

Tip: wear these on the flight (as well as any other heavy items of clothing) so they don’t count towards your luggage allowance.

 

1 pair of sandals

A pair of outdoor type sandals are great to give your feet a break from your hiking boots at night (your feet will thank you for it!).

It’s a good idea to get sandals that are quite enclosed so you can wear socks with them when it is cold higher up the mountain.

 

4 Pairs of Pants

 

2 pairs of trekking pants

Add quick dry trekking pants to your hiking gear list for the Everest Base Camp Trek – wear these during the day. It can be handy if one pair is convertible into shorts so you have the flexibility for the hotter first couple of days of the trek.

 

1 pair fleece pants

Fleece tracksuit pants are wonderfully warm and snuggly for those cold evenings in the teahouses, and it’s nice to have a clean pair of pants to change into at the end of the day.

 

1 pair thermal leggings

Great to layer under your trekking pants with women’s thermal underwear as it gets colder higher up the mountain.

 

 

4 Tops

 

3 t-shirts

Synthetic technical t-shirts are best as they wick any moisture away and are quick drying. 2 short sleeved tees and 1 long sleeved tee will give you the flexibility to layer as needed.

 

1 thermal top

Long sleeved and made from merino, don’t leave this out of your hiking gear list for the Everest Base Camp Trek. It’s a great option to layer with as the temperature drops.

 

 

4 Jackets

 

1 light merino jacket

I found this invaluable for the trek. The merino perfectly insulates you and keeps you warm, while at the same time being light and airy to wear.

It was my go-to for pretty much every day of the trek once we reached the colder climates.

 

1 windproof and rainproof jacket with hood

The weather can be unpredictable, so this is great to have in your daypack every day. It’s handy as an extra insulating layer over the merino jacket if you get a little cold.

 

1 hooded down jacket

Several people have asked me if I thought a down jacket was essential, and I’d say a definite yes! It’s great for chilly evenings in the teahouses, as they can get quite cold if you’re not near the stove!

It’s absolutely needed if you’re climbing Kala Patthar before sunrise, we saw several people that had to turn back as they were way too cold!

Tip: if you won’t use a down jacket again, you can rent them in most trekking shops in Kathmandu. If you’re going to through a trekking company they’ll be able to help you organisz it.

 

1 fleece jacket

Much the same as the fleece pants, these are great for something clean and warm to wear in the teahouses at night.

 

 

Accessories

 

5 pairs of socks

Thick merino trekking socks. If you can fit more pairs than this in, do it – there’s nothing better than a clean pair of socks for your weary feet!

Tip: you can also purchase merino liner socks to wear under your trekking socks, these can help reduce friction and blisters.

 

2 pairs gloves

One thin pair and one ski-style. It’s good to be able to layer the thinner pair under the ski gloves so your hands don’t freeze when you need to take off the heavier ones to take photos etc!

 

1 buff

A buff is a tubular piece of knit fabric, that’s able to be worn in many different ways. I mainly wore mine around my neck as a scarf, but it’s also handy as a headband, face protector (there’s a lot of dust on the trek!), etc.

 

1 beanie

A beanie is a fun way to inject some colour and personality into your outfit, with the added bonus of keeping your head warm!

I picked up a really cute one in Nepal, and it kept my head nice and toasty all trek, as well as being a cool souvenir to bring home.

1 pair of sunglasses

 You’ll end up wearing these every day of the trek, as even when it’s cold there tends to be a lot of glare. A wraparound style is optimal to give your eyes the most protection possible.


If you happen to forget anything, you can easily buy any extra essentials in Kathmandu when you arrive in Nepal, or even in the largest towns on the trek, Lukla and Namche Bazaar. I hope this hiking gear list for the Everest Base Camp Trek helps you prepare for your own trip. Enjoy the adventure!

 What would you add to this hiking gear list for the Everest Base Camp Trek?


 

For more packing tips, please read:

 

Suggested Travel Resources:

 


Hope you found this hiking gear list for the Everest Base Camp Trek helpful. Please share this post with your friends on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest. Thanks for reading!


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Author Bio: Erin is a travel and adventure blogger who fell in love with Asia six years ago and has travelled every chance she gets since! She has canoed through limestone karsts in Phang Nga Bay, stayed with a local Indian family in Varanasi and watched the sun rise over Mt Everest from the summit of Kala Patthar. You can read about Erin’s adventures on her blog No Ordinary Nomad or follow her on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram.

 


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